10 BEST | a guide to portrait - Part 1

Updated: Nov 8

Children photography is my favorite because you can play with them and imagine concept of adventures and smiles will ensure. I am happy to help parents who want to capture better images of their little ones. Here is a quick 10 best portrait poses to help you get those frames fill up.


1. Include the best furry friend

Capture the strong bond between your kiddo and their pets. If your dog is too excited, have the child hug him in place, or give him a nice walk before the shoot. Having a treat on hand is also always a good idea. Have someone hold the treat behind you., so the dog will be facing and smiling for you. Cats and smaller pets will do better indoors or in an enclosed area. Keeping the fur BFF safe, is also very important.




2. Keep it simple

A simple backdrop and prop have the potential to turn an ordinary pose into a portrait you will want to frame. Here, the long flower kept Sunny focus and add interest to an otherwise plain setting. A cute smile, baby legs, the red door and the elegant simple flower all work together to capture the simplicity of any toddler.





3. Sit + Smile


Sitting in a new way on a piece of furniture is far more exciting than the normal way. Think backwards chairs, arms of sofas, or anything

that they’re not usually allowed to rest on. It’ll be incredibly fun for the child and the photo. In this example, the dog took the high chair and the 8 year old couldn't help but smile.




4. Pretty Headrest

This is a easy pose that shows character and originality. Let your kid do whatever feels natural on the grass. Leaning on his elbow, hands on the chin, or head down on the grass.With the child looking right at the camera, take several shots with and without smiles. Don't forget to be at the same eye level. For this angle to work, you need to be on the grass yourself. Your kid will love that play time with you.



5. Play dress up

Dress up is an easy way to get a child comfortable in front of the camera. Find out what the favorite costume is and go from there. Keep the background simple so that all focus stays on the costume, and encourage kids to become their character for playful stances. This little fairy, for example, had nothing but laughs during our session.




6. Keep that stuff animal close

If the child has an irreplaceable stuffed animal you must capture that tender relationship. It’s also a good way to earn trust with a shy child, and coax them out of their shell. Get them to hug and squeeze it, interact with it, or just keep it close while you snap away.





7. Hide and Seek


This idea is one of the easiest ways to get a sweet smile. Try a fun hide and seek game or anything unexpected to prompt unguarded expressions. The image is interesting because of the lines but the memory of that game with them, with the laughter is what I remember when I look at that frame. Keep this in mind. A great shot, is a great shot. But a couple of hours of fun with them, is something worth framing.



8. Step it up

Fences are a super easy way to add some background interest. Fill the frame as shown, or play around with angles and tilts to get an

edgier look. Growing tween love

climbing up fences—a good way to

get their faces smiling—while

older kids can try reclining and

simple sitting poses.



9. Lean on me

Give the child something to do with her hands by

having her sit down and tuck a knee under her chin. Or resting the head on the hands is a classic pose, and also lets her relax a little while she looks at the camera. Ask her to spot her reflection in the lens so you get an intrigued look. Making a little one imitate the older one is also a sure way to get a true smile.




10. Get whimsy

Get creative with props and accessories to set a whimsical tone. Tents, blankets and colorful stuffed animals and hats in a woodsy outdoor setting indicates kid inspired imagination. It doesn’t have to make sense—just ask for a small selection of favorite things and create your own story.

© 2020 by Mirabelle Photography. 

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